My Musings

Demolishing Strongholds

Demolishing Strongholds

The apostle Paul wrote of using weapons of warfare that are not of the flesh to “demolish strongholds.” (2 Corinthians 10:4, NIV) He meant “arguments and every pretention raised up against the knowledge of God.” (vs. 5). Maybe Paul’s culture was as hostile to God and the progress of the gospel as ours is today.

Question #1: Is it acceptable for Christians to volunteer to help clean up our littered public highways?

Sure! Why not? But if so, how about cleaning up America’s cultural highways? They are quickly becoming cluttered with moral garbage. They are spiritual death traps for most travelers, especially children. Can’t Christians be as concerned about moral trash as we are about material garbage?

Question #2: Can a carcass-cluttered highway be tolerated?

Of course not. We deal with road-kill by hiring people to clean it up immediately. However, America tends to deal with culture-kill far less responsibly. We pile it on. We mock those who call attention to it or try to clean it up. Our corrupt culture not only tolerates culture-kill, we often glorify it.

Question #3: Is it acceptable for Christians to show respect for God’s creation by working to keep our air and water less polluted?

Yes, I admire Christians who are good stewards of the physical resources God has given to us. Can’t we also work to protect human hearts and minds from moral pollution that is lethal at a deeper level? Why not?


Culture is a force far more powerful than any raging river, political party, human law, lethal weapon or dangerous enemy. That’s why Plato said, “Let me write the songs and poems of a nation and I care not who writes the laws.”

America’s cultural highways are becoming unmarked moral graveyards. The stench is there but many of us have lost our moral sense of smell. We can have clean air, pure water, and uncluttered highways and still be in a moral coma as a people. Christians cannot live complacently with that. Paul didn’t.

For Example…

  • When the culture contends that humans are simply chemical and biological accidents in a random universe, the people will behave like accidents of nature. How can we keep a vibrant sense of virtue and purpose under that mindset?
  • Do you have a clear idea of what the Bible is about? America’s rich legacy of biblical literacy is fading fast in a culture that is increasingly hostile to Holy Scripture.
  • Are you addicted to lotteries, profanity, pornography, perversion, or cheap media entertainment? Stop! Don’t let your life become cultural carnage!
  • If you can vote for a candidate who supports Planned Parenthood (taxpayer-funded abortion providers) or cannot stand up for marriage between one man and woman, then you’re a casualty of a culture in moral freefall.

“Greater is He…”

America’s culture glorifies sin and stigmatizes repentance. It mocks those who pursue purity and exalts those who flaunt filth. Television is exhibit A. When the stream of culture gets polluted, we all suffer (especially children). Nevertheless, as Christians, we take confidence in the wise words of the apostle John: “Greater is He who is in you than he who is in the world.” (1 John 4:4).

The power of culture cannot intimidate Christians. Christian love is not a call to surrender in the face of evil but it can radically transform how we fight. So stand up, not down. Let love lead you forward, not backward. Our culture is dying from a thousand cuts. There comes a time for Christians to stand and fight the lofty strongholds and pretentions of culture. In so doing, let us “take every thought captive to make it obedient to Christ (2 Corinthians 10:5).


About the Author:

Joel graduated from Pepperdine University with a B.A., completing two majors: Art and Religion. He went on to earn the Master of Divinity degree from Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. The views expressed on this blog are personal and belong to Joel Solliday unless otherwise stated. They are not, intended to characterize the views of the Lewiston Church of Christ or other organizations to which I may refer.